Insulin Injection Shortage Get Worse with Increase of Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin Injection Shortage Get Worse with Increase of Type 2 Diabetes

The US study team believe this increase could lead to an insulin shortage for people with type 2 diabetes unless access to the hormone is significantly improved.

The authors note several limitations, including that the projections of type 2 diabetes prevalence do not account for dietary and physical activity environments changing over time, which means that the disease could have a much larger or smaller impact in the future.

The rate at which people are developing diabetes has experts anxious that we will not be able to keep up with the demand for insulin.

In type 2 diabetes, insulin helps control the disease and avoid or push back complications like blindness, amputation and stroke.

A few months ago, another study conducted by researchers at the University of Colorado had revealed that methyldopa, a common drug used to treat hypertension could prevent the onset of type 1 diabetes.


"These estimates suggest that current levels of insulin access are highly inadequate compared to projected need, particularly in Africa and Asia, and more efforts should be devoted to overcoming this looming health challenge", said Sanjay Basu from Stanford University, who led the research.

Insulin treatment is costly, and the global insulin market is presently dominated by only three major manufacturers.

Researchers said the amount of insulin needed to effectively treat Type 2 diabetes would rise by more than 20 percent over the next 12 years, but insulin would be beyond the reach of half of the 79 million Type 2 diabetics predicted to need it in 2030. Study Says The Ketogenic Diet Could Increase The Risk For Type 2 Diabetes.

The study was published Tuesday in the journal The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

"These estimates suggest that current levels of insulin access are highly inadequate compared to projected need, particularly in Africa and Asia, and more efforts should be devoted to overcoming this looming health challenge", said Dr Sanjay Basu, assistant professor of medicine at Stanford University in the U.S., who led the research. Between 2002 and 2013, the price of insulin tripled although there were only minimal increases in costs associated with the development of the treatment. "Except if governments start activities to make insulin accessible and affordable, at that point its utilization is continually going to be a long way from optimal".

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