Death toll rises to 48 as California Camp Fire rages on

Death toll rises to 48 as California Camp Fire rages on

The Butte County town has been all but wiped clean off the map by a fire that's claimed an estimated 6,700 homes and structures, some of which belonged to the emergency responders who were fighting to evacuate the town and get residents to safety.

More than 200 people were still missing as of Monday, Honea said.

"On Tuesday, the threat also shifts a bit farther south into San Diego County as officials urge against any outdoor burning that can lead to rapid and explosive growth of a fire", he said.

Search teams will fan out across the charred landscape of Paradise, California looking for human remains on Tuesday as authorities prepare for a rise in the deathcount from the state's deadliest wildfire.

Meanwhile, in Southern California firefighters made progress against the massive Woolsey Fire that has left two people dead in Malibu and destroyed more than 400 structures.

The flames all but obliterated the Northern California town of Paradise, population 27,000, and ravaged surrounding areas last Thursday.

The cause of the Camp Fire is also still under investigation but, as in the Woolsey Fire, power equipment in the area is being investigated as a possible source.


Myrna Pascua, whose husband was best friends with the man known as "Zeus", called him a "tireless provider, a dependable and loyal friend, a considerate neighbor, and loving father". About 7,700 homes were destroyed. The Camp fire up north was 35 percent contained, Cal Fire officials said Tuesday.

They said over the weekend that 177 buildings had burned amid predictions that the number would grow higher with new damage assessments.

The lawsuit is seeking an unspecified amount to cover a variety of losses, including lost homes, properties and personal belongings, as well as evacuation and temporary housing costs, emotional trauma and loss of income.

Some of the thousands of people forced from several communities by the huge Southern California wildfire are being allowed to return to their homes.

As of Sunday night, the fire had grown to more than 133 square miles (344 square kilometers) and it was 15 percent contained.

Before the Paradise tragedy, the deadliest single fire on record in California was a 1933 blaze in Griffith Park in Los Angeles that killed 29.

To the south, Woolsey Fire has blackened almost 94,000 acres and was also 30 percent contained as of Monday night, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CalFire).

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