Midterms 2018: Firsts for women in the US House

Midterms 2018: Firsts for women in the US House

In rapid succession, the House got its first two Muslim women: Minnesota's Ilhan Omar and Michigan's Rashida Tlaib.

The first black woman elected to represent MA in Congress is Boston City Council member Ayanna Pressley, who faced no Republican on Tuesday.

The high-profile midterm cycle that produced a record number of women contenders and candidates of colour means a number of winners will take office as trailblazers.

Pressley was the first black woman to serve on Boston's city council and made history again after defeating the 10-term incumbent Michael Capuano in the primary.

Democratic congressional candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez speaks at her midterm election night party in New York City on Tuesday. In Georgia, the race for governor between Democrat Stacey Abrams - who is vying to be the first black woman governor in the USA - and Republican Brian Kemp remains too close to call.

Also in the Senate, Republican Marsha Blackburn will become Tennessee's first woman senator.

Tuesday night's elections saw an influx of diversity "firsts" in the House of Representatives, ushered in by the record-breaking candidacies of women - specifically women of color - on the Democratic ticket. He hadn't had a challenger in 14 years, and now, a democratic socialist in favor of Medicare for all, a Green New Deal, and abolishing ICE, who happens to be 29-years-old, represents the 14th Congressional District of NY.

Texas has elected its first Hispanic woman to Congress, with Democrats Veronica Escobar and Sylvia Garcia winning their house seats.


Georgia candidate Stacey Abrams, a Democrat, was in a fierce battle to become America's first black woman governor, while Democrat Andrew Gillum narrowly lost his bid to become the first black governor of Florida. A recent New York Times article, for instance, called white women "gender traitors".

Some of Tuesday's black female pioneers, like IL nurse and Democrat Lauren Underwood and CT teacher and Democrat Jahana Hayes, were first-time candidates.

A lawyer and former MMA fighter, Davids became the first Native American congresswoman and the first lesbian congresswoman from Kansas. Such representation is particularly marked when President Trump has made flagrant anti-Muslim bigotry a key part of his political rhetoric, and some state-level Republicans are attempting to disenfranchise Native Americans en masse with Jim Crow tactics.

She added that even women of colour who were unsuccessful will inspire a new crop of candidates, similar to the white women encouraged to run after Hillary Clinton's 2016 presidential election loss. ME and South Dakota also elected their first female governors with Janet Mills and Kristi Noem, respectively.

CNN projected at the same time that eight women - four incumbents and four non-incumbents - would win gubernatorial races. "Have the awkward conversations, take the emotional labor off the backs of women who have more on their g***amn plate than we ever will. Do".

In response to these posts, many felt that these comments were not only racially charged, but they were anti-feminist because they essentially relay that white women aren't capable of voting for issues that are important to women. Democratic women won one Republican-held seat in IL, two in Iowa, and one in Kansas.

"On the Democratic side, these races were viewed not only as a referendum on President Donald Trump, but also, in many cases, on his version of identity politics, which in its final days played to the fears of his base, a group that is largely white, male and Christian".

"Powered by a massive turnout of women and fuelled by our incredible candidates, House Democrats gained several seats in the heartland", Democratic representative Cheri Bustos of IL said in a statement Tuesday night after House control was called for Democrats.

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