Kabul attack on election workers kills 1

Kabul attack on election workers kills 1

Polling stations in Afghanistan's Kandahar province opened on Saturday, one week after the rest of the country cast ballots in parliamentary elections, owing to a delay due to violence.

Raziq was among three people killed in a brazen insider attack on a high-level security meeting in Kandahar city that was attended by General Scott Miller, the top United States and North Atlantic Treaty Organisation commander in Afghanistan. The war toppled the militant group; however, some 17 years on, the Taliban are still active in two-thirds of the country and involved in widespread militancy, killing thousands of civilians as well as Afghan and U.S. forces despite the presence of US-led foreign troops.

"We were anxious about attacks but our security arrangement worked to prevent disruption of the vote", Zia Durani, a spokesman for Kandahar police.

"There were problems with the voter's registration lists, some (sections of the) alphabet were missing and people were disappointed and left the process without casting their votes", Rohullah a resident of Kandahar said.

Stakes are high for Afghans hoping to overhaul Parliament, challenge the dominance of warlords and the politically corrupt and replace them with a younger, more educated generation of politicians.

One policeman was killed and four others injured outside the Independent Election Commission's offices in PD9 of Kabul city on Monday morning in an explosion, police said as per a report by TOLONews.


Preliminary nationwide results are expected to be released in November. Thirty-two of Afghanistan's 34 provinces voted over two days on Oct 20-21. Another eight people were wounded, he said, although the casualty numbers could rise.

No group claimed responsibility for the attack.

But some polling centers had still not opened by 8am, while dozens of people lined up outside.

The parliamentary election, which was more than three years late and the third since the fall of the Taliban in 2001, is seen as a dry run for next year's presidential vote.

Ghazni elections were delayed for an as yet indefinite period due to disagreements over constituencies and security issues.

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