Second suspect in Skripal poisoning identified: Research group

Second suspect in Skripal poisoning identified: Research group

The Skripals were poisoned by the Russian nerve agent Novichok, and while neither of them died, a British woman was later fatally exposed to the nerve agent.

Mishkin traveled extensively under the name Petrov between 2011 and 2018, including multiple trips to Ukraine and to the self-declared Transnistrian Republic, Bellingcat reported.

Bellingcat said on its website that the man British authorities identified as Alexander Petrov is actually Alexander Mishkin, a doctor working for the Russian military intelligence unit known as GRU.

"During his medical studies, Mishkin was recruited by the GRU, and by 2010 had relocated to Moscow, where he received his undercover identity - including a second national ID and travel passport - under the alias Alexander Petrov", Bellingcat said.

A second suspect in the poisoning of an ex-Russian spy and his daughter has been named by a British investigative website.

British Prime Minister Theresa May said the attack was likely ordered at the highest levels of the Russia government, an allegation vehemently rejected by Russian President Vladimir Putin.

The website had earlier identified Ruslan Boshirov, the first suspect, as the GRU's Anatoliy Chepiga.


It said that Mishkin was born in 1979 in the Archangelsk region in Northern European Russia and was trained as a military doctor for the Russian naval armed forces at one of Russia's elite military medical schools.

They were found unconscious on a bench outside the Maltings shopping centre in Salisbury.

Britain last month charged two Russian men with the poisoning. They said they went to the city to visit its cathedral.

Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov told RT's editor-in-chief they had nothing to do with the Skripals' poisoning.

The Skripal case and last week's revelations that the GRU also allegedly tried to hack into the world's chemical weapons watchdog in the Netherlands have further tattered Moscow's strained ties with the West.

Russian Federation denies any involvement in the poisoning, and the two men have said publicly they were tourists who had flown to London for fun and visited Salisbury to see its cathedral.

This is how British authorities discovered the two Russian agents allegedly behind the novichok attack.

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